Author Topic: The Lore Game  (Read 40310 times)

Ashwil

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Re: The Lore Game
« Reply #210 on: April 21, 2011, 12:53:06 PM »
Yes Digger, the alternative fate of Arvedui was that he would be last king of Arthedain, as Arthedain would become part of a larger realm of the Dúnadain.

Fíriel's father King Ondoher was slain in battle by the Wainriders of the East, and so were both of her brothers.  From the north, Arvedui claimed the crown "as the direct descendant of Isildur, and as the husband of Fíriel, only surviving child of Ondoher." 

In particular, it was apparently one man, the Steward of Gondor Pelendur, who rejected Arvedui's claim with the argument that "In Gondor ... heritage is reckoned through the sons only ... ", ignoring the more ancient traditions of Númenor that had recognized queens.  And so it was a short-sighted bureaucrat who doomed Arvedui and delayed the reunification of the Northern- and Southern-Kingdoms for a thousand years.

I think that means the next question is yours, Master Goodsong.

Orophor

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Re: The Lore Game
« Reply #211 on: April 21, 2011, 01:13:11 PM »
Was it not Tavolos that wrote the answer?

Ashwil

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Re: The Lore Game
« Reply #212 on: April 21, 2011, 10:55:49 PM »
Oh dear, my mistake!    (I referenced the reply from Latest Posts where Digger's name appears as the one who started the chain)

Yes, it's Tavelos. So sorry!  Tavelos, the next question is yours.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2011, 08:23:09 AM by Ashwil »

Tavolos

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Re: The Lore Game
« Reply #213 on: April 22, 2011, 04:09:30 AM »
While we are on the subject of the younger race, let us continue the current trend with another question on the Edain. 

A tall, graceful tree of white wood covered in smooth, white bark with leaves that were dark green on one side and silver on the other, the White Tree of Gondor now represents the throne in Minas Tirith as the centerpiece of Gondor's banner.  Originally, the tree meant something entirely different, but it has travelled a long and difficult road.  What was the tree's origin, and what series of events led to its current place in the courtyard of the White Citadel?